The Livable Communities Coalition

Working to improve Atlanta's quality of life through smart growth

Roundtable prepares for Oct. 11 meeting

The region’s transportation future gained some clarity at Thursday’s Atlanta Regional Transportation Roundtable.

For one, the full 21-member roundtable appears ready to hedge its bets on the transit vision outlined in the roundtable executive committee’s draft project list, released Aug. 15.

The proposed Cumberland transit line serves as one example of the compromises the roundtable will seek in negotiating a final project list.

On the other hand, there are other issues outside the control of the roundtable that complicate the negotiations. Those issues became so pronounced that the roundtable voted Thursday to table discussion on the most problematic amendments. At stake is a transportation vision that could bring metro Atlanta into the 21st-century.

And at one point, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed felt compelled to question the direction of Thursday’s proceedings when Douglas County Commissioner Tom Worthan expressed his belief more needed to be done to increase funding for GRTA Xpress buses at the expense of MARTA state of good repair.

Reed also warned that this process is the opportunity to get the right list that best serves cities and counties as the local economy recovers.

The recent transportation public meetings held in each of the ten counties proved critical in driving the amendment process, according to several roundtable members.

And while that public input seems to have delivered a message that a change in focus is desired, it may actually be the 11th hour politics driving the final negotiations as the roundtable works towards the Oct. 15 deadline.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that the most recent poll shows a near consensus on metro Atlanta’s transportation problem.

According to the poll, 91 percent indicate it is important for the region to address its transportation problem in order to relieve congestion and improve quality of life.

Furthemore, 82 percent of respondents believe it is important to do more to encourage everyone to commute to work by bus or train.

But only 51 percent say they are likely to vote in favor of the referendum today, perhaps indicating the politics of the final list will be a significant factor in helping next year’s referendum pass.

The early talk about regionalism threatens to devolve into a scramble to help local voters determine “What’s in it for me?” Tuesday’s meeting may yet salvage a regional transportation vision for metro Atlanta that answers that question.

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